The second annual Digital Learning Fair brought students from around the Edmonds School District together in a two-hour event, that showcased students’ inventions and projects created using classroom technology.
Many aspects of digital learning were on display from coding, to robotics, to computer applications that create music.

The event was held at Alderwood Middle School on May 4 with over 36 different presentations from 19 different schools in the field of computer science and technology which is rapidly becoming the future of our education system and our economy.

Brian Fulmer who is an Instructional Technology Coach for Edmonds School District, who helped organize the event, says the Digital Learning Fair is a great way to bring all the schools together, and give students a chance to showcase their accomplishments.

“This is an opportunity for us to support teachers, and a way to bring everyone together and give students a chance to see what everyone is doing.” Fulmer says.

Fulmer emphasized outside contributing groups to the fair, including University of Washington students from the Paul G. Allen School of computer Science and engineering known as Allen Ambassadors.

The presentation by the Allen Ambassadors was the use of Edison robots. Edison robots are used to teach computational thinking and computer programming in a hands on way. The robots teach programming concepts in a fun way students can interact with.

Edison robots
University of Washington student from the Paul G. Allen Center of Computer Science & Engineering showing students how to use Edison robots.

Allen Ambassador, Alex Banh stated the study of computer science is a rapidly growing field, and computer science reaches into all aspects of the creative process not just solely computers.

“Computer science is the future of other things not associated with computing, such as music, art, and even construction.” Banh says.

“It gives a chance for our students to talk to college students who are doing the same things and it really makes a difference,” Fulmer says. “These technologies are a powerful and contemporary way for students to express themselves.”

Meadowdale High School Senior, Jacob Vaughn, presented a 3-D printing machine at the fair demonstrating the process of 3-D printing and demonstrating for other students how to prototype their own inventions.

“3-D printing can help people out in many ways,” Vaughn said. “It can be used for just about anything including making prosthetics for kids that can be customized and very cool looking.”

3D Printing
Meadowdale High School student Jacob Vaughan with his project, “3D printing and how it can help you.”

Vaughn hopes to someday make educational videos about 3-D printing and how it can be used in art and science. 3-D printing is the future for many career fields ranging from construction to the medical field.

A display by Sherwood Middle School presented three online applications that help students write and compose music, select different beats and layer sounds together to write songs on the computer. The apps Incredibox, Flat.IO, and Chrome Music allow students the opportunity to create music without a playing an instrument. Sherwood Middle School music teacher Annie Floe says these apps allow students to explore a musical creative side.

“Students who otherwise would not consider doing music, now have an opportunity to try.” Floe said.

Music programs
Sherwood Elementary School showcase of “Flat and other music programs.” Pictured are (upper) Patrick Kotwis and (lower) Sara Djuldanic.

Another feature at the fair was a project from Meadowdale Elementary that is using live mobile daily announcements at the school streamed through a secure YouTube channel.

Meadowdale Principal Dan Davis says he works with sixth-grade students to bring those announcements to the school from multiple locations every Monday and Friday.

“It gives a chance to showcase different projects that different classrooms are doing. There are new events each day and it is live and interactive.” Davis said.

Live morning announcements
Meadowdale Elementary School project, “Live morning announcements.” Pictured are Meadowdale Elementary Principal Dan Davis with students (right) Yadira Reyes-Cisneros and (left) Aisha Alvarado.

Lynnwood Elementary had a showcase for coding by third graders. Coding teaches students how to give instructions to a computer, understand sequencing of instructions, and problem solve.

Animal poems and coding
Lynnwood Elementary School project, “Animal poems and coding.” Pictured are Lynnwood Elementary School Teacher Mrs. Nelson with (front) Angelo Avilo and (back) Audry Nalugon.

Third-grade teacher Mrs. Nelson encourages students to learn coding especially when it gets difficult.

“We try to get kids prepared for the future,” Nelson says. “It is a great way to learn how to problem solve.”

As the future moves further into the digital age, Fulmer says the goal is for students to have access to technology and for every student to have a Chromebook at some point in the future.

“When every kid has a Chromebook it provides students the choice, and the ability to share beyond the walls of the classroom,” Fulmer says. “We are committed to bringing tech to students.”

Below is a list of all the district schools that were represented in the event:

  • Alderwood Middle School
  • Beverly Elementary School
  • Brier Elementary School
  • Cedar Valley Community School
  • Edmonds Elementary School
  • Hazelwood Elementary School
  • Lynnwood Elementary School
  • Lynnwood High School
  • Madrona School
  • Maplewood Parent Cooperative
  • Martha Lake Elementary School
  • Meadowdale Elementary School
  • Meadowdale High School
  • Scriber Lake High School
  • Seaview Elementary School
  • Sherwood Elementary School
  • Spruce Elementary School
  • Terrace Park School
  • Westgate Elementary School

Mario Lotmore

Mario Lotmore is originally from The Bahamas and for the last seven years has called Mukilteo, WA his home. Having lived in every region of the United States has exposed him to various cultures, people, and approaches to life. Lotmore created the Lynnwood Times to represent the character of a diverse and growing Lynnwood. The launching of the city’s free community newspaper will only help bring neighborhoods together. Lotmore was an industrial engineer by trade and proven success implementing and managing lean accountable processes and policies within his eighteen years of operations excellence, strategic development, and project management in the aerospace, manufacturing, and banking industries. Over his career he has saved and created hundreds of union and non-union jobs. Lotmore is the President of a Homeowner Association, an active Science Technology Engineering and Mathematics volunteer in his community, and former Boeing 747 Diversity Council leader. Mario’s talent is finding “that recipe” of shared destiny to effectively improve the quality of life for others.

Mario Lotmore has 565 posts and counting. See all posts by Mario Lotmore

2 thoughts on “Alderwood Middle School hosted second annual Digital Learning Fair

  • May 12, 2019 at 5:44 PM
    Permalink

    Hello! i’m Jacob Vaughan (the 3D printing part of it was by me) and thanks for including me! although, you did misspell my last name! thought i might let you guys know so you can correct it!

    Reply
    • May 16, 2019 at 10:46 PM
      Permalink

      Thank you and corrected it!

      Reply

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *


Notice: Undefined offset: 16 in /home/mlotmore/lynnwoodtimes.com/wp-content/themes/colormag-pro/inc/widgets/colormag-weather-widget.php on line 178