By Erin Freeman | Press Release

The commanding officer of Naval Station Everett, U.S. Naval Captain Michael Davis, held a virtual coffee chat with the Economic Alliance of Snohomish County on the morning of November 10, conversing with community members about updates regarding Naval Station Everett.

“His naval career of over 30 years includes service at sea on many service ships… he also served on a variety of shore commands,” said the city of Everett Mayor Cassie Franklin, introducing Capt. Davis. “It’s truly an honor to work with Captain Davis; he’s collaborative, he’s passionate about equity, and a true partner. He’s driven that we have the best and strongest base right here in the city of Everett.”

As one of the four largest naval installations in the Pacific Northwest, it supports $300 million of $1.3 billion of the four bases generated economic growth throughout the region. 

“We’re a pretty good economic engine that drives local area,” said Davis.

The base was created in 1994 to support both navy and coast guard ships. Currently, seven ships are attached to the naval station, with five destroyers and two cruisers which will be departing after receiving their respective maintenance. Another destroyer ship, the U.S.S. McCampbell, is expected to arrive next year, with two additional ships anticipated in the coming years. Two coast guard ships are also at the base.

“This is very good because I have been a very big proponent of growth,” said Davis.

Moving into the impact the coronavirus has had on the naval station, Capt. Davis explained that the pandemic has been challenging to the installation, with health protection conditions halving the people running the base, switching off every other day.

“This is specifically designed to protect the installation and protect the people here,” explained Davis.

It has been Capt. Davis’ ultimate goal and challenge to protect the ships and installation extending his positions responsibility of security to coronavirus outbreaks as well.

The navy has not stopped operational missions, continued Capt. Davis, with various safety protocols in place to mitigate any coronavirus outbreaks and spreads. One barrack has transformed into a quarantine spot, isolating anyone who has been in contact with a positive case or begins presenting symptoms.

“That is always going to be my number one priority…to make sure they are operational,” explained Capt. Davis.

In the future, Capt. Davis looks forward to the continued growth of the station and strengthened partnership with the community and its stakeholders.

“While we don’t know what the future holds, we are doing everything in our power to be as prepared as possible,” said Davis. “I cannot and we cannot move alone.”

Erin Freeman

I graduated from Washington State University in 2019 with a Bachelor of Arts in English with a specialization in rhetoric and professional writing. I also received a minor in political science. I joined the Lynnwood Times in February of 2020. To me, community newspapers affirm a sense of community by connecting people through the coverage of local stories and current events.

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